On the Use of "Velcro"

So the Velcro company just put out a video about not using the word velcro in a way that would weaken its trademark.

The video is clearly trying to be funny but the company appears to be serious about the dilution of their trademark. Well, I think they are way too late on trying to change public habits on this, but what is really strange is when they say, in the text description of the video:

So please, do not say “velcro shoes” (or “velcro wallet” or “velcro gloves”) - we repeat “velcro” is not a noun or a verb.

Um, guys, the word velcro is being used as an adjective in those examples! The company may be displeased with having the word in lowercase, but those examples are using the word in the form they actually want it used, as a modifier to a noun. The problem with these examples is actually that the clasp in question may not be an actual product of the Velcro comapny, not the part of speech.

It's a good rule of writing: if you don't know what you mean, your reader won't know, either.

I also notice that the people at Velcro, Inc., want us to write the word in all-caps: VELCRO (with a registered trademark symbol affixed). But Velcro is not an acronym, as explained right there on the Velcro web site. I know that companies are always fudging the rules of capitalization (and punctuation and everything else) in a bid to make themselves and their trademarks more noticeable, but there's no reason in the world for the rest of us to play along. These requests should be distributed among Velcro's own PR department staff and to overly-compliant news outlets. Putting this kind of content in front of the public is not a good look!

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